Mi poesía

Un poema de mi portafolio (Córdoba, Argentina 2008)

cordoba, argentina centro

N5

             O N5, espero para vos

Y espero

                     Cada día estoy ocupada y corro a tu parada

Cada vez más frustrada

Porque espero para vos

                                                   Y espero.

Cuando pienso que no puedo esperar más,

                                Te veo en la distancia y llegas.

                     Hoy tu forma es distinta,

         Ay, más vieja, las ventanas son tintas

 Y por hoy no vamos a estar lentos porque esta es tu forma de los años setenta

¡Y tu conductor no espera, conduce como está en una carrera!

¡Qué suerte!

Hay un asiento y puedo sentarme

Con mis pensamientos de tus obreros,

Tus lindos pasajeros,

Mi querido N5.

Hay mamás y papás

Abuelos y tías…

Siempre están pasando los días

De ir y de vuelta.

Enfrente de mí hay una chica, y ¿cómo se llama, Candela, Norita?

No sé, pero somos parecidas, alumnas, mujeres, las mochilas listas.

Aunque hay una cosa distinta,

Ella es una nativa, tiene su vida acá en Argentina.

¿Y yo? Yo no soy la misma, nativa ni argentina…

Yo soy observadora (shhh…no decís extranjera mi querido N5, porque por ahora soy otra pasajera, exactamente como los demás).

Y aunque espero para vos

                                                                Y espero

Adentro de sus puertas querido N5,

Puedo ser la Candela, la Norita

La alumna, la mujer, la chica con la mochila lista

Puedo ser argentina.

Inglés (English)

N5

Oh N5, I wait for you

And I wait

Each day I am busy and

I run to your stop

Each time more frustrated

Because I wait for you

And I wait.

When I think that I can’t wait

More,

I see you in the distance and

You arrive.

Today your appearance is different,

Oh, much older, the windows are tinted

And for today we are not going to be slow because you are from the 70s

And your driver doesn’t wait, he drives like he’s in a race!

What luck!

There is a seat and I can sit

With my thoughts of your workers,

Your beautiful passengers,

My beloved N5.

There are mothers and fathers

Grandparents and aunts…

Always passing the days

Coming and going

In front of me there is a girl, and what is her name, Candela, Norita?

I don’t know, but we appear the same, students, women, bookbags ready.

However there is something different,

She is a native, she has her life here in Argentina.

And me? I am not the same, native nor Argentinian…

I am an observer (shhh…don’t say foreigner my beloved N5, because for now I am another passenger, exactly like the others).

And although I wait for you

And

I wait

Inside your doors beloved N5,

I can be Candela, Norita

The student, the woman, the girl with the bookbag

I can be Argentinean.

Field Trip!

As it is the end of exam season this semester, we’re going on a field trip!  A group of students and I are heading out to Ikea today to meet, greet, and practice a little ‘household’ Spanish. In light of our outing, I thought I would share some vocabulary with you.  You never know, you might learn something new! In the ATL area…drop by around 2pm.

ikea

Furniture- los muebles

 

La mesa- table

 

La silla- chair

 

El escritorio- desk

 

El sofa- sofá

 

La lámpara- lamp

 

Los estantes- bookshelves

 

El sillón- armchair

 

Las cortinas- curtains

 

La ducha- shower

 

La cama- bed

 

La almohada- pillow

 

Las sabanas- sheets

 

El mantel- blanket

 

El basurero- wastepaper basket

 

El congelador- refrigerator

 

Las velas- candles

 

El lavamanos/(lavaplatos)- sink (dishwasher)


 

A viajar y regresar

Thankfully we made it back safe and sound from a very quick trip up north.  The drive was long, but very beautiful as all the leaves are changing and the air has that fall freshness. What I loved the most was watching the landscape gradually change, from evergreens to corn fields, grassy hills, and finally back to the familiar.  Although I have to say, one week makes a big difference and I can definitely see fall here in the South.  The temperatures are cooling down and everything is covered with a fresh dusting of leaves (that are nowhere near as colorful as those up north).

Coming back after being away and getting back into ‘the swing of things’ always seems like such a difficult thing to do, until it’s done.  This is especially difficult since I had to say such a quick “hello” and “goodbye” to both my parents (particularly my Mom).  But we are all excited for the upcoming holidays and more opportunities to spend time with each other.  So, with renewed excitement I am happy to return to helping you all again!

Ahora empezamos de nuevo…

Image

Megan

viajo otra vez la semana que viene…

Next week I get to return up North for a quick trip and will end the week with another quick with my Mom (yay!).  I’m very excited to go and be able to see family again since I usually travel only once a year.   In light of my trip I wanted to share some travel vocabulary with you.  Learn it, use it, enjoy it!
el viaje- trip
el vuelo- flight
el agente de viajes- travel agent
las maletas- suitcases
el boleto- ticket
el auxiliar de vuelo- flight attendant
el piloto- pilot
el pasajero- passenger
el equipaje- luggage
el taxi- taxi
el aútobus- bus
el tren- train
el aeropuerto- airport
viajar- to travel

It’s Official!

It’s official, summer is finally here!  And for us, here in Atlanta today wasn’t much different from the previous few days.  It was hot, but not super humid (yet), and sunny.  I know that my family up north had a hot one today, 93 degrees!  So far it’s been a summer of pleasant surprises.  We’ve welcomed new students of all ages and levels, and we’ve added our new language (and lovely tutor) Mandarin.  It’s been so exciting and we’re so looking forward to the upcoming school year!

But I suppose we shouldn’t get too far ahead of ourselves.  In the midst of all these goings-on, I’m super excited to head north for a cousin’s impending nuptials!!  I can’t wait to see the family, congratulate the bride and groom, and spend some quality time with my dad.  I’m thankful to have such a wonderful family and am looking forward to visiting, relaxing, revitalizing, and coming home with more excitement for the rest of the summer and into the school year!

As always, let us know if you need us for Spanish, English, or Mandarin lessons!  Any age, any level!  And we look forward to hearing from you soon!

¡Chau Chau amigos!

The Food I can’t live without…

 

  • Peanut Butter Scare

    I don’t know if I have five foods I couldn’t live without, but I can think of two. Peanut Butter and Apples. Yes, I know what it probably wouldn’t be on the top of everyone’s list, but if you think about it I think that these two foods make pretty good sense.
    First, peanut butter is a great source of protein–that’s why it was created more or less. Second, apples are a great source of fiber. Third, both of these are very yummy and particularly awesome together.
    When I was studying in Argentina, finding peanut butter was a hard thing to do. Most Argentinians think that peanut butter is disgusting and would never think of eating it. The woman I lived with, (she was amazing) trekked all through downtown Cordoba to find peanut butter for me (this was after my Mom sent me one of those giant jars of JIF that you use primarily for baking).
    When Rosita did find peanut butter, she brought some home and then said to me…”What do you do with it?” I think that my mouth almost hit the floor and I said something like, “What can’t you do with it? Then I explained that with peanut butter the possibilities were endless…”PB & J, PB and toast, PB and chocolate, PB and apples, PB and celery, PB and bananas….” I felt like Bubba from Forrest Gump listing all the things you could do with shrimp.
    After my long explanation Rosita started to soak it all in and even began to partake of the peanut-buttery-goodness. It was nice to share a little bit of my foodie culture with someone who made amazing food. And, I learned that it was very hard for me to live without my PB!

     

los taxistas

It’s about that time….you know what time I mean…election time.  Well, Election Day is some nine months away but we get to hear about all the candidates, all the scandals, all the snide remarks….etc. And I will be the last one to give away my political views, but I do remember where I was this time four years ago.  I was in Cordoba, Argentina…studying abroad and only hearing news from the U.S. every few weeks.

And where did I hear most of that news from?  The taxi drivers.  They knew more about the American political system and government than the average American (sad, but true).  Almost every time I jumped in a taxi, the driver would begin a conversation…”¿De dónde vos?”  And once he found out I was an American I was grilled on my political views and knowledge of the candidates.

I was very intrigued by some of the conversations I had in a taxi cab and probably one of the best wasn’t about politics at all but about the American people.  Once while riding in a taxi, the driver asked me about where I was from in the U.S. and the states that I’d visited.  When I replied that I had only really been up and down the East Coast he asked, “Why is it that Americans can send their children to other countries when they haven’t avidly traveled their own?”  I have to admit I was struck dumb by his response.

At first I thought, well the U.S. is so big…and I only know a handful of people who have been to every state.  But in reality, Argentina is almost as long as the U.S. is wide and practically everyone travels all over the country by bus.  So, I guess the truth is (that most) American kids (and adults for that matter) do travel but we don’t have an extensive transport system…and only a vague concept of geography.  You can disagree with me, but ask a high school graduate to name all the capitals of every state and where to locate them on a map…better yet try other countries…and then we’ll talk.

After all my musings, I realized that the driver had a truly valid point.  So, as much as I wish I could be studying and romping around another country during this election period, I am thankful to be home and see it as an opportunity to learn more about the candidates, the economy, and government.  Thank you Mr. Taxi Cab Driver!