I saw the sign

While studying abroad in Córdoba, Argentina, we had the opportunity to travel around the country during our free time.  As we traveled, I began to notice the signage; bus stops, cross walks, graffiti, and translated signs.  In highly trafficked tourist areas there were many signs in various languages.  In these places I noticed that the signs translated from Spanish to English, were not always translated correctly, which made me wonder, how often do we also make those mistakes?  However, although some words were missing, one could understand the message!

Picture 1 Picture 2 Picture 3 Picture 4

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The Elf and the Doctor

elf2doctor1

There once was a little Elf. He was so silly, always running around from place to place. When people asked him, where he lived he always replied, “Everywhere!” To which they would inquire, “Now, where is that located??” One moment he’d be happy, the next he’d be sad–he was an emotional little fellow. He scared easily, laughed easily, cried easily, and was never afraid to express his feelings. He always made sure if he made changes they were temporary.

One day he met the Doctor. The Doctor wasn’t like him at all. He was always described as “tall, dark, and handsome”–great characteristics in a man! He had a great occupation (you know, being a doctor), rarely left his place of origin, which of course was somewhere in New England. Unlike the Elf, the Doctor was always on time and attended church regularly, his religion was very important to him. And if he did change something in his routine he changed it permanently.

A little story to help remember the difference between SER and ESTAR

SER- to be
yo soy
tú eres
él es
nosotros somos
vosotros soís
ellos son
Used for (Permanent):

Description
Occupation
Characteristics
Time
Origin
Religion

ESTAR- to be
yo estoy
tú estás
él está
nosotros estamos
vosotros estaís
ellos están

Used for (Temporary):

Emotions
Location
Feelings

I.O., D.O., I don’t know…

parlote_jpg_640_640I’ll be perfectly honest with you…learning about Indirect and Direct Objects in Spanish stinks.  When I first started learning them (in Spanish), I thought to myself, “I don’t even remember what these are in English!”  I guess I should have, but I didn’t.

So to clarify, for those of you who may not recall.  Direct objects are the “objects” or “things” we talk about in the sentence and the Indirect Object is the person who receives the action.   Yes, I know it sounds confusing, but I’ll explain.

She brings me the ball.

She= subject

brings= verb

me= Indirect Object

ball= Direct Object

Now in Spanish our Indirect Objects are:

Yo me
Tú te
El le
Nosotros nos
Ellos les

And Direct Objects (for right now) are:

lo/la

los/las

* These depend on whether the object you are talking about is feminine or masculine, singular or plural

Order:

In Spanish, we always place the I.O. first, then the D.O., and they both come before the conjugated verb. OR in that same order (I.O., D.O. then attached to the infinitive= Verb in AR, IR, or ER form)

Examples:

Let’s go back to our first example:

She brings me the ball.
español

Subject: Ella
I.O.: me
Verb: trae
D.O.: la pelota
Ella me da la pelota.

She brings me it (the ball).

Ella me la trae.

I know that you are looking at this and saying, “This is so backwards!” The truth is yes, it is, but remember these rules for Spanish:

1. Your verb is conjugated to agree with your SUBJECT

2. Your I.O. comes BEFORE your D.O.

3. Both your I.O. and D.O. come BEFORE your CONJUGATED verb

I know it’s a lot! But the next post will explain your I.O.s and D.O.s in more depth!

But now, I.O., D.O. you DO KNOW!

Hasta la próxima vez…

 

 

una crucigrama

puzzles

 

Para la Navidad yo hice una crucigrama especial.

Hay varias palabras para todos los días de festia del año y las cosas que comemos y tenemos para celebrar.

¡Espero que disfrutélo!

¡Felices Fiestas!

 

los días de fiesta

 

la letra ‘j’

reloj

¡Hola todos!

Today I want to talk about the letter: J en español (hota)

This special letter is pronounced like the Engilsh H…por ejemplo…

jo- is ‘ho’

ja- is ‘ha’

je- is ‘he(y)’

jalapeños are ‘ha-la-pen-yos’…not ‘jall-a-penos’

so, what about this one:

el reloj

tick-tock

viajo otra vez la semana que viene…

Next week I get to return up North for a quick trip and will end the week with another quick with my Mom (yay!).  I’m very excited to go and be able to see family again since I usually travel only once a year.   In light of my trip I wanted to share some travel vocabulary with you.  Learn it, use it, enjoy it!
el viaje- trip
el vuelo- flight
el agente de viajes- travel agent
las maletas- suitcases
el boleto- ticket
el auxiliar de vuelo- flight attendant
el piloto- pilot
el pasajero- passenger
el equipaje- luggage
el taxi- taxi
el aútobus- bus
el tren- train
el aeropuerto- airport
viajar- to travel

¡Feliz Cumpleaños!

Since my own birthday is right around the corner, I thought I would post some Spanish birthday vocabulary…

Enjoy….

feliz cumpleños– happy birthday
torta de cumpleaños– birthday cake
fiesta de cumpleños– birthday party
las velas– the candles
regalos de cumpleaños– birthday gifts
los invitados– the people you invite to the party
¿Cúantos años tienes?– how old are you?
–Tengo (#) años– I am  (#) years old.

¡Feliz Cumpleaños a todos!