Spanish Lessons for Kids (1) Balloon Faces

Are you teaching Spanish lessons to younger children and find yourself wondering, “How do I do this??”

When I first started teaching children I felt like that all the time.  I’d never really been around young children and I was at a loss at what to do.  Then I realized, young children want to have fun and learn, get them moving, creating, talking, dancing while you teach.

So for this lesson what you’ll need are:

1. Balloons (any color, and make sure no one is allergic to latex)

2. A magic marker

3. A good set of lungs

Blow up the balloon, tie securely, and help children draw parts of the face on the balloon.  Make sure they are big enough so everyone can see.  If you like you can label the parts of the face.

Ask the children, “Cómo se llama?” and have them give Mr. Balloon Face a name.

Next ask the children, “Dónde están las orejas de “Mr. Balloon Face”?  You can also help by pointing to your respective body part.

Toss the balloon to each child and give them a chance to answer a few of your questions.

This method also works well to teach emotions.

For emotions, blow up several balloons and help the children draw faces for “triste”, “feliz”, “enojado”, etc.

Make a game by tossing a random balloon and asking the child the emotion.

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Subjunctive What??

As you’ve probably noticed…Spanish has a million verb tenses.  Okay, not really a million, more like 14.  Perhaps one of the most common (0r confusing) is the Subjunctive tense.  It’s a little difficult to explain because we don’t have a subjunctive tense in English, only a Subjunctive Mood.  The Subjunctive, tense or mood is used to express doubts, wishes, and conjecture….when we think something might happen, but it may not.

Subjunctive Mood (English):

I hope that we can go the the beach this weekend. (We may or may not)

See how were not using a different tense in English to express doubt?  Just the good old present tense.

Subjunctive Tense (Spanish):

-We use this tense to express:

Wishes

Emotions

Needs

Doubts/desires

Impersonal Expressions (weird name, but IEs are expressions where there is no particular subject, but a general statement, i.e. “It is best that we leave now so we’re not late.”)

To form the Subjunctive Tense in Spanish we use the opposite verb endings:

AR Verbs

yo- e
tú- es
él- enosotros- emos
uds.- en

IR/ER Verbs

yo- a
tú- as
él- a
nosotros- amos
uds.- an

We also (generally) have two verb phrases joined by “que”:

(Yo) Espero que ellos lleguen temprano.
I hope that they arrive early.

Formula: Subject 1 Verb 1 (present tense) + que Subject 2 Verb 2 (subjunctive tense).

The reason for this formula is:

There is NO doubt that I want them to arrive early (that’s why Verb 1 is in the present tense)

BUT I don’t know if they will be early or not (that’s why Verb 2 is in the subjunctive tense)

 

Hopefully that’s not too much of a brain-scrambler! More to come soon!